Presenter

Gianluca Lopez is an anatomic pathology trainee from Italy, currently at UCLA as a visiting neuropathology fellow.

Author

Gianluca Lopez1,2, Karam Han1, Shino D. Magaki1, Sophie X. Song3, Noriko Salamon4, Kanwarpal S. Kahlon5, Inna Keselman 6, Ausaf A. Bari7, Harry V. Vinters1

Authors’ affiliations:

  1. Section of Neuropathology, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center and David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA
  2. University of Milan, Milan, Italy
  3. Section of Hematopathology, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center and David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA
  4. Department of Radiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA
  5. Division of Hematology-Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA
  6. Department of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA
  7. Department of Neurosurgery, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Abstract

A 65-year-old female with a resolved history of epilepsy due to a motor vehicle accident and hippocampal sclerosis presented with recurrent, de novo seizures. Brain imaging demonstrated enhancement in the left parieto-occipital lobe. At histopathological examination, the lesion displayed a diffuse lymphoid infiltrate comprised of small atypical lymphocytes, plasmacytoid lymphocytes, and scattered plasma cells, with amorphous eosinophilic material deposition.

Discussion points

  1. Is this a neoplastic or reactive process?
  2. What is the nature of the amorphous eosinophilic material?
  3. What ancillary testings should be performed?
  4. What is the diagnosis?

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